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Spectacles of Sovereignty in Digital Time: ISIS Executions, Visual Rhetoric and Sovereign Power — The ISIS videos staging the executions of James Foley and Steven Sotloff are usually understood as devices to deter, recruit, and “sow terror.” Left unanswered are questions about how these videos work; to whom they are addressed; and what about them can so continuously bring new audiences into existence. Analysis, ISIS, Propaganda, Terrorism Perspectives on Politics
Can Taking Down Websites Really Stop Terrorists and Hate Groups? — "Racists and terrorists, and many other extremists, have used the internet for decades and adapted as technology evolved, shifting from text-only discussion forums to elaborate and interactive websites, custom-built secure messaging systems and even entire social media platforms. Recent efforts to deny these groups online platforms will not kick hate groups, nor hate speech, off the web. In fact, some scholars theorize that attempts to shut down hate speech online may cause a backlash, worsening the problem and making hate groups more attractive to marginalized and stigmatized people, groups and movements." Counterterrorism, Europe, Propaganda, Regulation, Terrorism, UK, US, Violent Extremist VOX-Pol
ICSR / VOX-Pol Paper – Research Perspectives on Online Radicalisation: A Literature Review 2006-2016 — This literature review seeks to recalibrate our understanding of online radicalisation, how it is conceptualised within the literature and the extent to which the policy debate has advanced in response to technological and legal developments. Academia, Propaganda, Terrorism
Media Jihad: The Islamic State’s Doctrine for Information Warfare — Weeks after its capture of Mosul in 2014, the Islamic State set about transforming its strategic trajectory. Through an avalanche of media products, it worked to aggressively insert itself into the global public discourse and, in turn, popularise its brand, polarise adversary populations and drive rivals into the ideological side-lines. This research paper presents new, empirical insight into this troubling phenomenon, which has set a benchmark for insurgent strategic communications the world over. Comprising the translation and analysis of a 55-page document compiled and published by the Islamic State in 2016, it offers a unique window into the mind-set of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s propagandists. Academia, Propaganda